Reg’s Cupboard Love – #MuseItUp #DaffodilAndTheThinPlace

Reg’s Dlog (Well, what else would you call a dog’s blog?)

What would you expect to find in a cupboard?
Clothes? Brooms? Food?

A cupboard full of stairs in the wooden annexe at the end of St. Nicholas Church
A cupboard full of stairs in the wooden annexe at the end of St. Nicholas Church

Well, last week, I came across a cupboard full of stairs.
Yes, really.
The Old Girl opened the door and behind it, there were stairs. And all the steps were different sizes. It was the strangest staircase I’ve ever seen. It’s not for the claustrophobic but I loved it!

It wound round to the right and after we’d climbed a bit, there was a door, leading to a room but we kept going round and round, until we finally came to another door at the top. As we climbed, the walls got closer and the ceiling got lower until the Old Girl had to bend over so she didn’t knock her head. She’s only 5ft 2″, so you can imagine how small the space was. We opened the door at the top and we were in little room with one small window.

This was the place where the school children who went to Puckles’ Charity School slept if they were boarding (you can read a bit about Puckles’ School here, on my dlog if you missed it)

Three floored wooden annexe at the end of the church
Three floored wooden annexe at the end of the church
Items for washing in the top floor room
Items for washing in the top floor room

You can just make out the small window in the white part of the roof, towards the left of the second photo. In the third photo, you can see me inside the room, with some of the things that have been gathered to make it look a bit more like it might have looked in the late 1800s. I think the jug and bowl were the washing facilities and you could say, I was sitting in the school children’s en suite bathroom.

When we’d had a good look round, we took our lives in our hands – well, the Old Girl took her life in her hand and me in the other – and we made our way half way down the oddly-shaped stairs to look in the room on the first floor.

It’s quite a lot bigger and is lighter because it has more windows. It would have been where the school master and his wife slept although in the Old Girl’s story, ‘Daffodil and the Thin Place’, it’s where Daffodil sleeps and where she is locked when she’s suspected of stealing something. I won’t tell you what just in case you haven’t read your copy of ‘Daffodil and the Thin Place’ yet.

What? You haven’t got a copy? Well, click here immediately or go to your favourite ebook retailer and purchase a copy immediately.
Please.
Well, I am, after all, a very polite dog.

Anyway, any money raised from the sale of the books will go towards St. Nicholas Church and will help to maintain the ancient buildings which obviously need a lot of attention.

There was another cupboard in the ground floor room, just to the right of the staircase cupboard in the first photo. Apparently that one is full of brooms but years ago, it was the toilet. As they didn’t have proper plumbing or drainage, I rather think this may have featured a bucket but we won’t dwell on that. I asked the Old Girl why there was a circular hole in the door, about the size of a dinner plate over which was a round cover. She said that when it was a school, naughty children were put in there and the hole covered, so that it was pitch black. Presumably, when someone just wanted to use the toilet, they left the hole open. Strange. Still, at least you could see what you were doing. And probably, so could everyone else.

There was also another form of punishment, which the Old Girl mentions in ‘Daffodil and the Thin Place’, which I thought was really rather harsh. But I won’t spoil it in case you haven’t got that far yet…

#MuseItUp

#DaffodilAndTheThinPlace

 

 

 

5 Comments

  1. khicks48

    Some of the old farmhouses in Pennsylvania have the same sort of stairs build into the wall at one end of the house. Nice to see where the idea came from.

    “well, the Old Girl took her life in her hand and me in the other” I love this.


    1. Interestingly, it says on our church website the following about the annexe: ‘Priests’ houses attached to a church are relatively unusual in this area, being more of a feature in the West Country; this factor naturally increases the importance of this example. It is also similar in design to buildings in New England in the USA, so it is possible that whoever built it had a connection with New England.’
      How lovely to have this sort of link between our countries.


    2. I thought I’d replied to this but my comment seemed to go elsewhere, so I’ll repost.
      Interestingly, it says on our church website the following about the annexe: ‘Priests’ houses attached to a church are relatively unusual in this area, being more of a feature in the West Country; this factor naturally increases the importance of this example. It is also similar in design to buildings in New England in the USA, so it is possible that whoever built it had a connection with New England.’
      How lovely to have this sort of link between our countries.

  2. khicks48

    Very cool, Dawn!

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